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'Intimacy 2.0' Interactive fashion by Studio Roosegaarde

by Daan Roosegaarde | Vimeo

'Intimacy 2.0' by Studio Roosegaarde are interactive, wearable dresses composed of leather and smart e-foils which are daringly perfect to wear on the red carpet.

In response to the heartbeat of each person, ‘Intimacy 2.0’ becomes more or less transparent.

More info at studioroosegaarde.net
and facebook.com/DaanRoosegaarde

— 2 years ago with 4 notes
#Fashion  #Technology  #Tech  #New Tech  #New Fashion  #Vimeo  #Video  #Intimacy  #Interactive Fashion  #Daan Roosegaarde  #Studio Roosegaarde  #Wearable  #Leather  #e-foils  #Red Carpet  #Red Carpet Fashion  #Transparent  #Transparent Material  #Facebook 

Flying-car prototype goes for test flight — and drive

Want to watch a car take flight? You are in luck. Terrafugia, makers of Transition — the world’s first flying car — has released video of a production-type prototype flying over Plattsburgh, N.Y. today.

The flight was the first successful test of the two-seat personal aircraft that you can park in your garage, drive on the road and fill up at a gas station.

"This is a very exciting time for Terrafugia," said Carl Dietrich, the company’s CEO and CTO. "We are on our way up — literally and figuratively!"

The Transition reached an altitude of 1,400 feet during its first test flight, and spent a total of eight minutes in the air, company officials said.

In the video, Terrafugia’s chief test pilot, Phil Meteer, is seen pulling the Transition out of a garage, driving it around a suburban neighborhood and then filling it up with fuel from a regular gas station.

When he gets to an airport, the car/plane’s wings automatically unfold. When the “transition” is complete, Meteer completes a pre-flight check and then takes to the skies.

"It’s a remarkable vehicle both on the road and now in the air," said Meteer in a statement. "When I drove it into the shop, literally from the road through the garage door, I was amazed that I had just flown it in Plattsburgh a few days before."

There are still six more phases of flight testing planned, but a spokesperson for Terrafugia said the company is still on track to to deliver the plane by late 2012.

Anyone with a driver’s license can drive the Transition on the road, but potential pilots will need a light-sports-aircraft license.

The Transition has a 23-gallon gas tank. It gets about 35 mpg on the road and burns about five gallons of gas per hour when it is at cruising speed in the air.

Terrafugia said it has already received about 100 orders for the Transition.

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

— 2 years ago with 1 note
#Los Angeles Times  #LA Times  #Los Angeles  #LA  #Business  #Technology  #Tech  #New Tech  #New Technology  #Flying-car  #Deborah Netburn  #Terrafugia  #Transition  #Flying Car  #Prototype  #Plattsburgh  #New York  #Carl Dietrich  #Phil Meteer 
Will your next iPhone have a 3-D camera?

By Michelle Maltais | Los Angeles Times
The cameras on generation after generation of iPhone have gotten increasingly better. So much so that it’s often the only camera owners carry these days. What could Apple have in mind for the future? The next dimension in iPhone cameras just might be 3-D.
Photos and video on upcoming iOS devices could be shot with what Patently Apple is calling “a killer 3D imaging camera.”
According to an Apple patent filing discovered by PA, the cameras would incorporate laser, RADAR, light-detection and ranging (LIDAR) sensors for detecting depth as well as sensors for more intense color accuracy.
And, get ready to geek out just a little more: The patent filing indicates the cameras would also be able to recognize facial expression and gestures. Talk about a smart phone.
PA explains: “Facial gestures may include, but are not limited to, smiling, grimacing, frowning, winking, and so on and so forth. In one embodiment, this may be accomplished by detecting the orientation of various facial muscles using surface geometry data, such as the mouth, eyes, nose, forehead, cheeks, and so on, and correlating the detected orientations with various gestures.”
If iPhone 3D comes to fruition, it wouldn’t be the first 3-D phone to hit the market. HTC’s Evo already broke the 3-D barrier.
But the possibilities for this technology on iPhones and iPads are myriad. It would be a significant upgrade from the 8-megapixel camera on the iPhone 4S and the 5 megapixel iSight camera on the new iPad. It might actually justify awkwardly holding up an iPad to shoot photos or video.
Now, before you go stand in line for the as-yet-unannounced new iPhone to get your hands on a palm-sized 3-D smartphone, remember that this is just a patent filing — not a promise to deliver.
That said, as long as it doesn’t diminish battery life, a 3-D camera would put that crystal-clear Retina display to pretty good use, don’t you think?

Will your next iPhone have a 3-D camera?

The cameras on generation after generation of iPhone have gotten increasingly better. So much so that it’s often the only camera owners carry these days. What could Apple have in mind for the future? The next dimension in iPhone cameras just might be 3-D.

Photos and video on upcoming iOS devices could be shot with what Patently Apple is calling “a killer 3D imaging camera.”

According to an Apple patent filing discovered by PA, the cameras would incorporate laser, RADAR, light-detection and ranging (LIDAR) sensors for detecting depth as well as sensors for more intense color accuracy.

And, get ready to geek out just a little more: The patent filing indicates the cameras would also be able to recognize facial expression and gestures. Talk about a smart phone.

PA explains: “Facial gestures may include, but are not limited to, smiling, grimacing, frowning, winking, and so on and so forth. In one embodiment, this may be accomplished by detecting the orientation of various facial muscles using surface geometry data, such as the mouth, eyes, nose, forehead, cheeks, and so on, and correlating the detected orientations with various gestures.”

If iPhone 3D comes to fruition, it wouldn’t be the first 3-D phone to hit the market. HTC’s Evo already broke the 3-D barrier.

But the possibilities for this technology on iPhones and iPads are myriad. It would be a significant upgrade from the 8-megapixel camera on the iPhone 4S and the 5 megapixel iSight camera on the new iPad. It might actually justify awkwardly holding up an iPad to shoot photos or video.

Now, before you go stand in line for the as-yet-unannounced new iPhone to get your hands on a palm-sized 3-D smartphone, remember that this is just a patent filing — not a promise to deliver.

That said, as long as it doesn’t diminish battery life, a 3-D camera would put that crystal-clear Retina display to pretty good use, don’t you think?

— 2 years ago
#Los Angeles Times  #LA Times  #Times  #Business  #Technology  #New Tech  #New Technology  #iPhone  #Apple  #Michelle Maltais  #3D  #3D Camera  #Camera  #Photography  #iOS  #Video  #Photos  #Patently Apple  #3D Imaging Camera  #Apple Patent  #Laser  #RADAR  #LIDAR  #HTC Evo  #iPad  #iPhone 4S  #iSight 
Swarms of mini laser satellites could deflect asteroids

By Evan Ackerman | DVICE Imagined by SyFy
Asteroids aren’t something to be concerned about on a day to day basis, but once every couple hundred years or so, we get hit with a doozy. The last one hit Siberia in 1908, so it’s about time to start to come up with a defense plan, and one new idea involves a bunch of tiny satellites with solar-powered lasers.
The idea with using lasers to deflect asteroids is not as cool as you might be thinking: there won’t be any slicing and dicing of space rocks. Aww. That said, it ispretty clever. The idea is that a laser is used to vaporize bits of rock on the surface of an asteroid, and doing so generates tiny little puffs of thrust. Enough puffs over enough time will start to measurably alter the orbit of a space rock, no matter how large, and with enough lasers cooperating, it could even be accomplished on short notice.
Instead of relying on one giant laser to do this, the same objective can be accomplished with lots of little lasers working together. The advantages of using a swarm of mini satellites, instead of a Death Star, are numerous: they’re simpler to design, cheaper to manufacture, if you need more power you can just launch more of ‘em, it doesn’t matter if you lose a couple, and their thermal exhaust ports are significantly smaller than a womp rat. And, if they’re rigged up to power their lasers with solar energy, they can keep on firing for a couple billion years.
Engineers at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, who have been developing this idea, also suggest that micro laser sats could be handy in Earth orbit, zapping some of that dangerous orbital debris. And totally not zapping anything else. Nope, nothing else at all.
Press Release, via KurzweilAI
For the latest tech stories, follow DVICE on Twitter at @dvice or find us on Facebook

Swarms of mini laser satellites could deflect asteroids

By Evan Ackerman | DVICE Imagined by SyFy

Asteroids aren’t something to be concerned about on a day to day basis, but once every couple hundred years or so, we get hit with a doozy. The last one hit Siberia in 1908, so it’s about time to start to come up with a defense plan, and one new idea involves a bunch of tiny satellites with solar-powered lasers.

The idea with using lasers to deflect asteroids is not as cool as you might be thinking: there won’t be any slicing and dicing of space rocks. Aww. That said, it ispretty clever. The idea is that a laser is used to vaporize bits of rock on the surface of an asteroid, and doing so generates tiny little puffs of thrust. Enough puffs over enough time will start to measurably alter the orbit of a space rock, no matter how large, and with enough lasers cooperating, it could even be accomplished on short notice.

Instead of relying on one giant laser to do this, the same objective can be accomplished with lots of little lasers working together. The advantages of using a swarm of mini satellites, instead of a Death Star, are numerous: they’re simpler to design, cheaper to manufacture, if you need more power you can just launch more of ‘em, it doesn’t matter if you lose a couple, and their thermal exhaust ports are significantly smaller than a womp rat. And, if they’re rigged up to power their lasers with solar energy, they can keep on firing for a couple billion years.

Engineers at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, who have been developing this idea, also suggest that micro laser sats could be handy in Earth orbit, zapping some of that dangerous orbital debris. And totally not zapping anything else. Nope, nothing else at all.

Press Release, via KurzweilAI

For the latest tech stories, follow DVICE on Twitter
at @dvice or find us on Facebook
— 2 years ago
#DVICE  #dvice  #SyFy  #Evan Ackerman  #Space  #Science  #Space Science  #Astronomy  #Asteroids  #Lasers  #Technology  #New Tech  #New Technology  #Mini Laser  #Satellite  #Asteroid Deflection  #Siberia  #University of Strathclyde  #Glasgow  #Europe  #Earth Orbit  #Micro Laser 

Printed Lights - Lighting Sheets Made of Tiny LEDs

By Kevin Bullis | Technology Review

Nth Degree Technologies plans to replace bulbs with lights that can be printed on large, flexible surfaces.

A company called Nth Degree Technologies hopes to replace light bulbs with what look like glowing sheets of paper. The company’s first commercial product is a two-by-four-foot-square light, which it plans to start shipping to select customers for evaluation by the end of the year.

The technology could allow for novel lighting designs at costs comparable to the fluorescent light bulbs and fixtures used now, says Neil Shotton, Nth Degree’s president and CEO. Light could be emitted over large areas from curved surfaces of unusual shapes. The printing processes used to make the lights also make it easy to vary the color and brightness of the light emitted by a fixture. “It’s a new kind of lighting,” Shotton says.

Nth Degree makes its light sheets by first carving up a wafer of gallium nitride to produce millions of tiny LEDs—one four-inch wafer yields about eight million of them. The LEDs are then mixed with resin and binders, and a standard screen printer is used to deposit the resulting “ink” over a large surface.

In addition to the LED ink, there’s a layer of silver ink for the back electrical contact, a layer of phosphors to change the color of light emitted by the LEDs (from blue to various shades of white), and an insulating layer to prevent short circuits between the front and back. The front electrical contact, which needs to be transparent to let the light out, is made using an ink that contains invisibly small metal wires.

The new transparent electrical contact could itself prove important as a replacement for the indium tin oxide (ITO) used in touch screens and other displays. ITO is brittle and can’t be printed, so it’s not suitable for flexible displays. It can also be expensive, depending on the price of indium.

While the devices the company has made so far are more efficient than incandescent lights, they’re not yet as efficient as fluorescent lights. They emit 20 lumens per watt, compared with about 80 lumens per watt for typical overhead fluorescent lights and 65 lumens per watt for compact fluorescents. A 60-watt light bulb from GE gets about 14 lumens per watt.

Shotton says the efficiency of the lights has been steadily improving in recent months. The goal is 50 lumens per watt for the first products and 75 lumens per watt by next year, which is comparable to many other LEDs. The best LEDs today get over 200 lumens per watt.

Printing with inks composed of tiny working LEDs produces much brighter light than depositing powders or thin films of electroluminescent material, two approaches that are already used to make flat night-lights and the greenish backlights on digital watches, and more recently to illuminate billboards with a white backlight.

Raghu Das, CEO of IDTechEx, a research firm that specializes in printed electronics, says printed-ink lights could be cheaper than the organic-LED (OLED) lights that have started to come on the market. OLED lights are expensive (one desk lamp costs nearly $6,000), and they have to be sealed inside rigid glass to protect the organic molecules from air and water.

The new design also makes the bulky heat sinks used on conventional LED lights unnecessary. Since the tiny LEDs are thinly and evenly distributed, the lights don’t get hot, Shotton says. The advantage of not having a heat sink is, however, offset by the fact that the LEDs require a substantial power source. To incorporate this power source, the company’s first light fixture will have to be two inches thick, even though the light-emitting surface is thin and flexible.

(Source: technologyreview.com)

— 2 years ago with 9 notes
#Technology  #New Tech  #New Technology  #New Technologies  #Technology Review  #MIT  #Science  #Nth Degree  #Nth Degree Technologies  #Printed Lights  #Lighting Sheets  #LED  #Kevin Bullis  #Flexible Surfaces  #Glowing Paper  #Neil Shotton  #Gallium Nitride  #ITO  #Indium Tin Oxide  #Raghu Das  #IDTechEx  #OLED  #Organic LED